Compassion Fatigue in Veterinary Medicine

compassion fatigueThose of us the in the veterinary industry are usually here because we love animals. As far as career choices go, there are many that offer better pay and hours, and far less physical labor and potentially risky situations. Any veterinary technician headed home at the end of a shift, with dog drool in her hair and cat fur on her scrubs, will tell you that she’s not in the job for the glamour.

While we share an undying love for our pet patients, working in a veterinary hospital can be an emotionally demanding career. Not every day is filled with successful treatment and happy endings. Sometimes caring too much can hurt, and compassion fatigue in veterinary medicine is a very real problem we deal with on a day to day basis.

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Children and Pet Loss: Helping Them Cope

children and pet lossThe death of a beloved pet is one of the most difficult paths we walk as humans, and can rock us to the very core. For children the experience can be especially intense, and consideration must be taken to help them understand death and learn how to cope with grief.

Children and pet loss certainly isn’t the most lighthearted subject, but it’s one that many families will face eventually. Your friends at Billings Animal Family Hospital hope that our insights on children and pet loss can help you and your loved ones through this turbulent time.

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Caring for Exotic Senior Pets

exotic senior petsIt’s fairly commonplace for dogs and cats to live long enough to earn their senior stripes. But what about exotic senior pets?

With advancements in wellness care, good husbandry, and better-than-ever treatment options, it is no surprise that all species are living longer lives than ever before. Caring for an older exotic pet is a little different than caring for a young one, though.

Do you know your stuff when it comes to caring for exotic senior pets? Billings Animal Family Hospital is here to get you up to speed.

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Use It or Lose It: Why Senior Pet Exercise Matters

Part of dog playing with ballThanks to advancements in veterinary medicine and increased owner involvement, our pets are living longer than ever. As a result, senior pet care has become more and more important.

Although some pets may still run, jump, and behave like a young pup or kitten, what happens when an older pet starts to slow down? It may seem more considerate to allow him or her to rest, but a healthy senior must keep moving. Keep reading to learn more about senior pet exercise and how to keep your sweet senior in tip-top shape.

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Senior Pet Diet and Nutrition for Greater Well-Being

Feeding the dogAs pets age, their nutritional needs will change. Just as a puppy or kitten requires a special diet for rapid growth, a senior pet diet may also need to factor in certain health and lifestyle changes.

Typically, many senior pets struggle with weight gain due, in part, to their inability to exercise as much as when they were younger. From mobility challenges to decreased energy, senior pet food should support the overall health and wellness of an aging pet.

Define “Senior”

With advancements in veterinary medicine and a focus on preventive care, pets are now living much longer lives. In fact, what constitutes “senior” or “geriatric” is now a bit amorphous, particularly if your four-legged is still quite active and in good health. Continue…

Caring for Senior Pets: Signs of Chronic Illness

Labrador dog resting indoorsJust like us, pets develop health problems as they age. It’s hard to admit (or even recognize), but modern veterinary medicine and regular at-home care can go a long way to improving and extending the lives of senior pets.

The Timeline

Senior pets are generally considered geriatric at 7 years old. As your pet ages, you may notice some behavioral changes. While some of these may be completely harmless, many shifts in patterns or habits can indicate larger health problems. Continue…